science outreach

Amsterdam Science-Art Slam

Back in May 2017, I was part of a Science-Art Slam in Amsterdam, organized by Claudia Mignone. Three astronomers/astrophysicists (David Gardenier, me, and Daniele Gaggero) gave 20ish-minute talks about our research, while at the same time musicians were creating free-improvisation music and a visual artist was mixing live projections of related scientific images. It was …

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What are neutron stars and black holes?

I research neutron stars and black holes, and the extreme environments immediately surrounding them. For a general-audience introduction, I highly recommend the videos by Phil Plait on the Crash Course YouTube channel!

AstroBetter series on Twitter at conferences

Twitter logo on Hubble deep field. Image credit: HST/Twitter/A.L. Stevens
My 3-post series on Twitter at academic astronomy conferences has concluded on the AstroBetter blog! The first post, aimed at non-Twitter users, explains the basics of Twitter and why it’s a good thing to have at conferences. The second post, aimed at current or would-be tweeters, gives tips and tricks for conference tweeting, and spawned a great discussion on openness and sharing of unpublished ideas. The third post, for LOC or SOC members, has a rundown of what needs to happen on the conference organizing side for Twitter to be successful at a conference. Join the conversations in the comments section of those posts or on Twitter! 😉

The series comes from a post here from this past May.

Twitter tips for academic conferences

UPDATE: A version of this post is appearing as a series of posts on AstroBetter! Earlier this week I attended the Netherlands Astronomy Conference 2016, organized this year by my institute. I was asked by the LOC to be on my Twitter game throughout the conference, and I’m really proud of the concerted effort made …

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Just how small are X-ray binaries?

X-ray binaries are so small that we can’t directly image (i.e., spatially resolve) them, due to a combination of being small in size AND very far away. When updating my Research page I was curious what a good analogy would be for imagining the projected size of an X-ray binary, and I’ve come up with …

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LogiCON

I’m giving a talk at LogiCON on May 4, 2013. It will be an updated version of “Exo-lent Planets!”, a talk I gave at Nerd Nite Edmonton. Visit the LogiCON website for more information. Registration is free!

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